Division growing in UN-imposed government over decision-making

Division growing in UN-imposed government over decision-making

January 15, 2016 - 15:51
Posted in:

Al-Gotrani complaint letter to Sirraj

For the second time in less than a week, the UN-imposed government seems to be in a state of uncertainty for not being able to agree on their decisions and statements.

The first decision of the government about security arrangements was totally rejected by the Deputy Prime Minister Ali Al-Gotrani, an ally to rogue Gen Khalifa Haftar, which could be seen as a growing discord among the members over the future of Khalifa Haftar.

The government formed on Wednesday an 18-memebr committee headed by pro-Libya Dawn Brigadier-General Abdul-Rahman Al-Taweel to facilitate the implementation of the security arrangements to pave the way for the government to enter Tripoli, but the decision did not meet the wishes of Al-Gotrani.

"We strongly reject the formation of the committee without concord or vote from the presidency council." Al-Gotrani said in a complaint letter to Sirraj.

"We will never accept this committee which includes controversial figures who led armed militias." He adds.

Al-Gotrani also called for reformation of the committee to include officers from the army and police only.

Early on Sunday, the UN-imposed government Khalifa Haftar-led army's efforts to eliminate terrorism from Benghazi and Libya in general.

This time, anti-Khalifa Haftar members Mohammed Zayad and Abdul-Salam Kajman deplored the statement shortly after its release, saying it was published without approval from the presidency council.

Sources said the statement was unilaterally written by pro-Khalifa Haftar members to lure Khalifa Haftar's supporters in eastern Libya, who still refuse Skhirat agreement because of uncertainty over Haftar's future, to accept and approve the agreement and its government.

In Tripoli, the Salvation Government ordered the Military Prosecutor to open an investigation into the decision of UN-imposed government on security arrangements, saying the decision would instigate civil violence and military disobedience. It also ordered him to question the 18 members of the committee.